Dance

Dance

July 7 - 26, 2019

Photo by Lisa Elmaleh

We are offering dance every week at Augusta this year! Workshops vary from mini-courses to full day workshops, from absolute beginner to experienced, and from Cajun two-step to cakewalks and cyphers. Every musical style represented at Augusta has a vernacular dance form connected to it, and we want to explore the history and traditions of those styles. Each dance workshop runs concurrently with the music themes listed below, plus arts, crafts, and folklore workshops and evening mini-courses. Evening activities include legendary late-night jams, concerts, dances, and more. Youth, as well as adults, are welcome to participate.

This year we are excited to expand dance offerings during each of our theme weeks, because the rich musical traditions we celebrate here also come with an equally vibrant social dance practice. Options will range from evening mini-courses to daylong workshops, and from Cajun two-step and Appalachian clogging to house dance and lindy hop. Dance mini-courses are open to the public or can be an addition to any Augusta participant’s schedule. Full-day dance participants will have an opportunity to sit in on afternoon cultural sessions and an array of elective workshops. Evenings will be packed with lively jams, slow jams, song swaps, dances and performances. These dance workshops range in level from scratch to advanced. Augusta is a nurturing, friendly environment to dive into these dance traditions and explore how they connect with the music and culture of the region. There is no day like today to put on your dancing shoes! – Becky Hill, Augusta Events Coordinator  and Dance Coordinator

Tuition Guide:
$490/week if paid before June 1. $
530/week if paid after June 1. 

(+ Room & Board or other available options.)

Register Here!

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Coordinator

Becky Hill, Augusta Events Coordinator  and Dance Coordinator

Becky Hill

Becky Hill grew up in Michigan, spent extensive time in West Virginia and now calls Nashville, Tennessee, home. She started dancing at age three and has worked with Footworks Percussive Dance Ensemble, Rhythm in Shoes and Good Foot Dance Company and has studied with an array of percussive dance luminaries; Eileen Carson, Sharon Leahy, Sandy Silva, Ira Bernstein, and many more. She has been awarded two West Virginia Division of Culture & History Professional Development Grants, choreographed two pieces in celebration of Wheatland Music Festival’s 40th Anniversary for the Carry it On Project, organized Dare to be Square Helvetia, West Virginia, for the past five years, serves part-time as the Events Coordinator for Augusta Heritage Center, coordinates the Mountain Dance Trail Project through Augusta, and teaches movement at the Linden Waldorf School in Nashville, TN. You can find her calling square dances, performing with the T-Mart Rounders and two-stepping the nights away. She directed her first evening-length music and dance show, Shift, inspired by Appalachia, in November 2017 and is excited to continue to work on it. (www.rebeccahill.org)

Cajun & Creole Week and Classic Country Week Dance: July 7 – 12

Percussive Dance Lab (Intermediate / Advanced) – Sandy Silva

To register, select “Dance, Arts, Crafts, & Folklore Week 1” on the registration form

Schedule:

  • 10-11am: Rudiment training rhythm, movement, and vocal integration
  • 11 am to noon: We will learn a specific sequence that connects with the morning rudiments.
  • Afternoons:  Personal training and private input. Students will work on solo and or group collaboration sequences guided by Sandy’s directives.
  • 4-5 pm: A time for questions, sharing work/phrases with constructive feedback

Sandy will begin each day sharing her integrated vocabulary within different musical styles. She will continue the morning by teaching a percussive dance sequence exploring connections between the workshop’s four themes:  rhythm, voice, movement, and improvisation (see below). She will then deconstruct this sequence and explore tools that engage with these four themes. These tools will give the participants more possibilities in their Body Music work and allow them to play with a wider range of music and movement ideas. Participants will also have the opportunity to share their ongoing work as individuals and/or ensembles, and receive Sandy’s feedback.

Workshop Themes:

  1. Rhythm: Sandy will introduce a series of exercises to strengthen your rhythmic technique and capabilities. These exercises (meter blocks) are structured to meet the signature blocks, accent placement, divisions of the pulse, and overall listening techniques with the aim of developing a deeper musicality within our work.
  2. Movement: Sandy will share techniques for developing a natural sense of ease and movement awareness while creating percussive sounds with the hands and feet. We will explore where and how to effectively place sounds within our body movements in order to ignite an ongoing flow from sound to sound. Ultimately, these skills will bring more musicality, intention, and presence to our work.
  3. Voice: Sandy will explore ways of using the voice to enrich our body music expression through humming, playing with combinations of flowing syllables, and constructing simple melodic sequences that play with, and around, our hand and foot grooves.
  4. Improvisation: – Sandy will teach grounding tools and exercises that build confidence and ease while exploring improvisation. She will draw from basic sectional body percussion vocabulary, and use accent placement and body awareness to make playful choices that flow, carry emotion, and allow us connect with and listen to others.”

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Sandy Silva

Sandy Silva is an award-winning choreographer, producer, and internationally acclaimed pioneer of percussive dance. She draws from global percussive dance practices infusing them with movement, voice, theater and impeccable musicality. The result is a unique and powerful form of performance and storytelling. After 25 years of performing and teaching around the world, Sandy started the Migration Dance Film Project with award winning director Marlene Millar. Their films have screened internationally and won numerous awards. The migration Dance Film Project will incorporate 8 short films into a full length feature film to be released in 2020.

Evening Mini-Course: Cajun Dance 101 (Beginning) – Amelia Biere

 

To register, select “Evening Mini-Courses, Week 1” on the registration form.

 

Class description coming soon!

Photo coming soon!

Amelia Biere

Bio coming soon!

Old-Time Week and Blues & Swing Week Dance: July 14 – 19

Dance: Walkarounds, Cakewalks, & Cyphers – Emancipation Ceremonies? (All Levels) – Junious Brickhouse and Jontavious Willis

This workshop will meet period 2 of Blues & Swing Week and will provide a historical and cultural framework for the House Party Dance class in the afternoon, but can also complement other music classes participants choose to take. We will investigate the early dance traditions associated with the blues and how those traditions have evolved into the present. Through lecture, discussion, and experiential movement, Junious “House” Brickhouse will be presenting in-depth research into these controversial art forms and their communities of practice, with emphasis on their critical significance to blues music and its legacy musical genres. We will discuss our roles as students of the blues in the preservation and evolution of this movement and social history that comes along with it. Participants should wear comfortable clothing and bring materials for taking notes.

To register, select “Blues & Swing Week” on the registration for

Junious Brickhouse

Junious “House” Brickhouse is an internationally established educator, choreographer, and cultural preservationist with over 30 years of experience in Urban Dance Culture. Born in Virginia Beach, VA, his dance training began at family gatherings dancing the funk styles of the era. Growing up, he sought out all the learning opportunities available to him, from community centers to parking lots, where young people were teaching each other and building communities around urban dance forms. Early on, he established himself as a leader and mentor in those communities, serving to educate and guide others. At age 18, Junious embarked on an over 21-year career as a Logistics Professional in the U.S. Army and later as a Department of Defense contractor. Throughout his time in various international assignments, Junious developed both a military an dance career, eventually rising to positions of leadership and responsibility in both areas. As the Founding Executive Director of Urban Artistry Inc. (www.urbanartistry.org), Junious has inspired and created a movement of artists dedicated to the preservation of urban dance culture, specifically within communities of practice. As Urban Artistry’s Executive Director, Junious produces projects such as The International Soul Society Festival, The Preservatory, and the UA Digital Archives to encourage other artists to research and document these tradition bearers and their stories. As a scholar/practitioner, Junious teaches at colleges and universities, using an experiential approach to teaching, Movement of the African American South, Hip Hop, as well as urban dance movement and the cultural context from which it evolves. As the Co-Director with Next Level, an initiative sponsored by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs in association with the Department of Music at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Meridian International Center for Cultural Diplomacy, Junious works tirelessly to promote international cultural exchange in underserved communities, conflict prevention and resolution, and entrepreneurial skill building through hip-hop music and dance. A citizen folklorist, Junious also conducts independent research into those cultural traditions whose influence is reflected in urban dance culture. From ring shouts and acoustic county blues to hip hop, understanding the nature and meaning of these art forms and their influences is what motivates this artist.

Jontavious Willis

Hailing from Greenville, Georgia, Jontavious Willis grew up singing gospel music at the Mount Pilgrim Baptist Church with his grandfather. At the age of 14, he came across a YouTube video of Muddy Waters playing “Hoochie Coochie Man” and was hooked. That’s when he set his course on the blues. As a fingerpicker, flat-picker, and slide player, he explored all types of blues — Delta, Piedmont, Texas, gospel — and on harmonica, banjo, and cigar box.

Four years later he was playing on Taj Mahal’s stage. Currently Jontavious is finishing his studies at Columbus State University, majoring in sociology. But on most weekends he can be found playing a small house show, up on the main stage, or posting music videos for his friends and fans around the world.

House Party Dance – Part 1 & Part 2 (All Levels) – Junious Brickhouse

Guided by Junious Brickhouse, the House Party Dance workshop will meet periods 3 and 4 and will dovetail with the String Band / Jug Band workshops. Learn to respond to the rich genres of string band and jug band music with dance, informed by tradition and open to innovation. The goal is to experience dance as a celebration of American blues music and to explore the variety of movement styles that have evolved from the blues including tap dance, house dance, and jazz dance. No specific dance or music experience is required, and participants should come prepared to move and learn through presentations, choreography, improvisation, and sharing. Comfortable clothes and shoes are recommended, hard-soled shoes or tap shoes are helpful if you have them but not required. Participants should also bring a water bottle and materials for making note of new ideas, steps, or movements.

To register, select “Blues & Swing Week” on the registration for

Junious Brickhouse

Junious “House” Brickhouse is an internationally established educator, choreographer, and cultural preservationist with over 30 years of experience in Urban Dance Culture. Born in Virginia Beach, VA, his dance training began at family gatherings dancing the funk styles of the era. Growing up, he sought out all the learning opportunities available to him, from community centers to parking lots, where young people were teaching each other and building communities around urban dance forms. Early on, he established himself as a leader and mentor in those communities, serving to educate and guide others. At age 18, Junious embarked on an over 21-year career as a Logistics Professional in the U.S. Army and later as a Department of Defense contractor. Throughout his time in various international assignments, Junious developed both a military an dance career, eventually rising to positions of leadership and responsibility in both areas. As the Founding Executive Director of Urban Artistry Inc. (www.urbanartistry.org), Junious has inspired and created a movement of artists dedicated to the preservation of urban dance culture, specifically within communities of practice. As Urban Artistry’s Executive Director, Junious produces projects such as The International Soul Society Festival, The Preservatory, and the UA Digital Archives to encourage other artists to research and document these tradition bearers and their stories. As a scholar/practitioner, Junious teaches at colleges and universities, using an experiential approach to teaching, Movement of the African American South, Hip Hop, as well as urban dance movement and the cultural context from which it evolves. As the Co-Director with Next Level, an initiative sponsored by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs in association with the Department of Music at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Meridian International Center for Cultural Diplomacy, Junious works tirelessly to promote international cultural exchange in underserved communities, conflict prevention and resolution, and entrepreneurial skill building through hip-hop music and dance. A citizen folklorist, Junious also conducts independent research into those cultural traditions whose influence is reflected in urban dance culture. From ring shouts and acoustic county blues to hip hop, understanding the nature and meaning of these art forms and their influences is what motivates this artist.

Evening Mini-Course: Fundamental Lindy Hop – Expressing Swing Music through Movement (From Scratch) – David Loomis

To register, select “Evening Mini-Course, Week 2” on the registration form.

Fundamental Lindy Hop – Expressing Swing Music through Movement (From Scratch): Lindy Hop is a 1920’s/1930’s style of swing dance that is as joyful, exuberant, and expressive as the hot jazz music that inspired it. In this course, you will learn the What’s, How’s, and Why’s of partnered Lindy Hop. You’ll learn how the history of jazz and early swing music inspired a new dance. We’ll connect Lindy Hop movements to their creative musical counterparts, and we’ll practice expressing our own joys through the dance. This class will be geared towards learning the fundamentals of Lindy Hop, and is open to dancers and non-dancers of all levels.

David Loomis

Amy and David discovered their passion for swing dancing in Southern California in the early 2000s, Amy under the tutelage of Erin Stevens of Pasadena, and David under the Bobbysox Brigade of Fullerton. Now based in Morgantown, WV, they teach community classes in Lindy Hop, Charleston, Collegiate Shag, Balboa, and Blues through the WVU Swing Dance Club and Morgantown Swing. Their teaching style emphasizes connecting with the music, developing comfortable partnerships, and communicating clearly as the foundation for every good social dance.

African Drum & Dance (All Levels) – Laurie Goux

In this mini-class you will learn to play some traditional West African rhythms of the Djembe drum, Djun-Djun drums, shekere, and ago-go bell along with songs in various African languages. Understanding the rhythms help you dance freely to the beat. A cultural journey with Mama Laurie that you will enjoy.

Laurie Goux

Laurie Goux began her Chicago career in 1981 and has served as an adjunct professor of dance at Davis & Elkins College since 2012. She taught her first class for Augusta Heritage in 2011. Laurie is a protégé of dance legends Jimmy Payne, Sr., and Tommy Gomez. She trained in Katherine Dunham Dance Technique and African-Caribbean dance. She has performed with musicians and dancers from Senegal, South Africa, Ghana, and the West Indies. She has shared the stage with Ghanatia International, Rafo International Combo, Alpha Yaya Diallo, Queen Asabia Cropper, Max-A-Million, Preach Freedom, and opened for Youssou N’Dour with Roots Rock Society. Laurie was a principal dancer with Mordine & Company Dance Theater and Sundance Performing Arts Company. She is an alumna and former faculty of Columbia College Dance Center where she taught modern dance as a part of the core curriculum. A recipient of grants from the West Virginia Department of Arts and Humanities Council and West Virginia Department of Education, she developed and implemented Arts-Integration curricula in Randolph and Harrison counties.

While in WV, she has collaborated on her most creative works, contributing choreography for the international film, Dancing Joy, and the following projects: “Rising Down” was a social justice dance duet set on Katharine Manor, extraordinary Tap dancer, and Kaia Kater, singer/songwriter, whose original music bearing the same title was recognized in Rolling Stone magazine. “Caribbean Tapestry” is a group piece set on D&E dance students and Austin Peay State University students, performed at both institutions in 2017 Spring Dance Concerts. “…and the Women” is a work inspired by the spiritual practice, movement, song, and rhythms of the traditional African American ring shout.

Goux is artistic director, co-presenter of the first Chicago Katherine Dunham Awards (1996-1998) and 19th annual “Keep the Legacy Alive: Tribute to Katherine Dunham” held at the Harold Washington Library, Cindy Pritzker Theater, Chicago, and the University of Chicago in collaboration with Ms. Ruby Streate and the Dunham Center for the Arts and Humanities. She produced, “Suite Chicago Blues”, featuring Max-A-Million’s rendition of Willie Dixon’s song, “My Babe” at DuSable Museum of African American History and Chicago Blues Museum exhibit of Bronzeville. She was co-presenter of “Ebony on Ice,” an original dance concert on ice to an anthology of black music from Africa to America with an international cast of black skaters.

Her work has been reviewed in Washington Post, NY Times, Chicago Tribune, and Chicago Reader. Ms. Goux’s training led her to master class residencies with Erick Hawkins, Bill T. Jones, Kei Takei, Judith Moss, Talley Beatty, Clay Taliaferro, Anna Paskevska, Hanya Holm, and more. She has performed in the works of Loretta Livingston, Shirley Mordine, XSight! Performance Group, “What are we going to do with Mary?,” “Isosceles Triangle,” and “Wait ‘til it Happens to You,” Jan Erkert’s “Sensual Spaces,” Robin Lakes, “Mouth,” Kate Kuper, Carol Bobrow’s “Hiroshima Trilogy”, Claudia Gittleman’s “Amartia” and Martha Clarke’s, “Haiku,” a trio performed by Mordine & Company with Tim O’Slynne and Brian Jeffery.

Bluegrass Week and Vocal Week Dance: 21 – 26

Traditional Irish Dance: Soft Shoe Jigs & Reels from Scratch – Madalyn Humphrey

Learn the techniques, rhythms, and movements that guide Irish dancers gracefully and uniquely across the dance floor in this beginner style Irish soft shoe class. There will be an emphasis on footwork, posture, quick-clean movements, turns, and leaps. We’ll begin with the fundamentals of Irish Dance. Later classes will incorporate rhythms and movements influenced by other traditional dances, modern movements, and creative flows. The goal is to leave the class with a collection of movements and steps ready for solo or social dance. Dancers should wear Irish soft shoes (gillies), ballet flats, or thick socks. This class is open to dancers and non-dancers.

Madalyn Humphrey

Madalyn Humphrey studied and practiced under the direction of Maxine Olson at the Scoil Damhsa Irish Dance School of West Virginia. There she competed, performed, taught, and discovered her passion for dance. Scoil Damhsa focused on Irish dance history, tradition, and precision in technique while encouraging creativity. Olson first brought Humphrey to Augusta for Irish Step Dance Classes in 2000, as an Augusta Scholarship Student where she returned for another eight summers. She was also a performer with the West Virginia Highland Dancers and the Davis and Elkins College Appalachian Ensemble. Currently, Humphrey works as a choreographer with the Old Brick Playhouse in Elkins where she uses her eclectic dance background to teach and foster movement in local young artists.